Fat Flour

An Exhibit by Jacqueline Flavio

Date(s) & Times

February 13-21, 2015

Opening Reception Fri. Feb 13, 6-9 PM

Gallery Hours Tuesday-Saturday
12-4 PM

Admission

Free

Sponsors

Katee Tully and Helen Levine

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Jacqueline Flavio is an emerging contemporary artist living and working in Tampa Florida. She recently received her BFA in painting from the University of South Florida and plans to pursue her MFA in the near future. Jacqueline’s work is comprised of large paintings inspired by her method of collage. The subject matter reveals her apparent love for the natural world but also serves as a commentary on the painted image itself. By dissecting and manipulating space, objectifying the very idea of ‘natural things’, viewers are asked to question the meaning of natural as it is translated into something seemingly artificial; relying on color to sustain life.

"As lookers in nature we objectify that of which is being looked upon with reverence and wonder. I want to understand my own attachment to the wild, to my artificial idea of the natural world. " - Jacqueline Flavio

Artist's Statement
Beauty resides in the objective; for all things object: treasures, people, or ideas become subject to our perception of the beautiful once we look upon them. The beautiful receives our admiration and our loyalty.
In a memory, the wild spaces of our lands are compartmentalized and dissected. With such an abundance of information in every sensory form, the wild is too large to imagine the whole. The whole is a feeling, it is a tone, it is an atmosphere. In the experience we come to know this whole.
Exploiting the use of foregrounded elements within a painted space recalls nature as a collection of things, of objects, an overwhelming oasis of raw material. This space is not a place, we no longer dwell here nor call it home; it is our escape from the familiar, from the secure monotony of civilization. As lookers in nature we objectify that of which is being looked upon with reverence and wonder. I want to understand my own attachment to the wild, to my artificial idea of the natural world.
Expending the flower for all that it is I intend to bridge this gap between craft and intellect, between the silly and the serious. The flower as an image, is as image as image can be, forever addressing the sickness that is the over-saturation of images in our contemporary culture.
I once was told that if we were to count the number of images one sees in a single day it could possibly be well over one thousand. What does this mean for our vision? How do we interact with images that we once confronted, now inescapable, now constantly confronting us? Where does the image go when there is nothing left to see?